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Before coronavirus became the word on everyone’s lips, Denver’s commercial real estate market was booming. Three new projects broke ground in the first three months of 2020, and Denver logged its largest office transaction in a decade—the $400 million sale of the Denver City Center, according to the Denver Post.

What a difference a few months make.

Now the market has stalled, and workers once looking for swanky office digs are eyeing spots at home to turn into office space.

For example, Mike Koenig, founder of Studio Shed in Boulder, told the Denver Business Journal that sales of sheds have spiked in recent weeks, jumping 150% in March year over year.

Studio Shed manufactures and sells prefab sheds that cost an average of $20,000. A far cry from the lowly aluminum sheds of yesteryear, these structures feature modern exteriors and finishes—and allow owners to separate work space from the main home.

“I think a lot of people are like, ‘Wait a minute, this is really great. There’s the psychological separation that’s needed to get out and work, but I’m still on my property.”

Of course, not everybody can afford a backyard office, and many are searching their homes for good spots to set up shop, whether it be “at the table; at the counter; in bed; on the counter; on the couch; in the garage,” notes a recent New York Times article.

Some are even considering using closets. “A closet is an ideal place for a desk,” George Evageliou told the Times. Evageliou is president of Urban Homecraft, a custom furniture company. “Yes, it’s a closet. But it’s also a great spot to eliminate distractions and focus.”

Whatever place you choose, he suggests you pick a space for work only “and keep it sacred”—even if it’s just a specified table. That way, when the work day is finished, you can still enjoy other parts of your home—and head back to work in the morning with nary a commute!